Summer reading list 2017-2018

Summer reading list 2017-2018

Independent Summer Reading

Littlestown High School  2017-2018

ENGLISH 9

INDEPENDENCE:   To do what? From what?

 

ALL STUDENTS

CHOOSE 1 FICTION AND 1 NONFICTION

 

Fiction: Watership Down (Richard Adams)                                Non-Fiction:  Persepolis Part 1 (Marjane Satrapi)

Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austin)                                                      A Long Way Gone (Ishamel Beah)

ONE: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne)                AND ONE:    Maus I (Art Spiegelman)

House on Mango Street (Sanda Cisneros)                                           Hiroshima (John Hersey)

Treasure Island (Robert Louis Stevenson)

 

ENGLISH 10                               AMERICAN VOICES:   What is identity and how is it created?

ACADEMIC ENGLISH 10                                             

ENGLISH 10                                

READ BOTH:

            

The Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald)

Catcher in the Rye (J.D. Salinger)

  READ BOTH

 

Call of the Wild (Jack London)

Into the Wild (John Krakauer)

 

ENGLISH 11          WORLD PERSPECTIVES:    What does it mean to be human?

ACADEMIC ENGLISH 11                                                  

ENGLISH 11

READ THREE:

 

  Kite Runner (Khaled Hosseini)

                            AND

  Dream of Ding Village (Yan Lianke)

  OR The White Tiger (Aravind Adiga)

                            AND

  Kaffir Boy (Mark Mathabane)

  OR Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China (Jung Chang)

   READ ANY TWO

 

Kaffir Boy (Mark Mathabane)

Trash (Andy Mulligan)

In the Time of Butterflies (Julia Alvarez)

The White Tiger (Aravind Adiga)

The Architect’s Apprentice (Elif Shafak)

Nectar in a Sieve (Kamala Markandaya)

 

 

ENGLISH 12                                                  BRITISH LITERATURE

ACADEMIC ENGLISH 12

ENGLISH 12

READ TWO & VIEW ONE

 

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson)

Great Expectations (Charles Dickens)

AND WATCH

One Shakespeare Comedy (Taming of the Shrew, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, etc)

READ TWO & VIEW ONE

 

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson)

Siddhartha (Herman Hesse)

AND WATCH

One Shakespeare Comedy (Taming of the Shrew, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, etc)

AP ENGLISH 12

READ ALL:

Brave New World (Aldous Huxley)                          Any Charles Dickens novel (except The Christmas Carol or A Tale of Two Cities)

1984 (George Orwell)                                             The Bible: First five books of the Old Testament and four Gospels (The Bible as literature)

All students are urged to carefully take notes, which may be used during testing. Tests will be given within the first few days of school to assess students’ ability reading, writing, and critical thinking.
 
Copies of all novels and videos are available at local book stores and at the public library.   Littlestown Library’s check-out policy:  Three-week check-out for reading materials, one week check-out for videos; titles may be reserved.
(This page left blank for 2 sided printing.  English 11 & 12 detailed descriptions follow)

Academic English 11 Independent Reading

Must read:
 
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Kite Runner begins in Afghanistan in the final days of the monarchy to the present.  This is the story of the friendship between two boys growing up in Kabul. Raised in the same household and sharing the same wet nurse, Amir and Hassan grow up in different worlds: Amir is the son of a prominent and wealthy man, while Hassan, the son of Amir’s father’s servant, is a Hazara—a shunned ethnic minority.   
 
**********************************************
Dream of Ding Village by Yan Lianke 
Officially censored upon its Chinese publication, Dream of Ding Village is set in a poor village in Henan province, it is an account of a blood-selling ring in contemporary China. This novel is based on a real-life blood-selling scandal in eastern China.  Whole villages were wiped out with no responsibility taken or reparations paid.  Dream of Ding Village focuses on one family, destroyed when one son rises to the top of the Party pile as he exploits the situation, while another son is infected and dies. 
 
OR
 
The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
The White Tiger follows a darkly comic Bangalore driver through the poverty and corruption of modern India’s caste society.  The white tiger of this novel is Balram Halwai, a poor Indian villager whose great ambition leads him to the zenith of Indian business culture, the world of the Bangalore entrepreneur. On the occasion of the president of China’s impending trip to Bangalore, Balram writes a letter to him describing his transformation and his experience as driver and servant to a wealthy Indian family, which he thinks exemplifies the contradictions and complications of Indian society.
 
***********************************************
Pick one: 
 
Kaffir Boy by Mark Mathabane
Mark Mathabane was weaned on devastating poverty and schooled in the cruel streets of South Africa's most desperate ghetto, where bloody gang wars and midnight police raids were his rites of passage. Like every other child born in the hopelessness of apartheid, he learned to measure his life in days, not years.  Kaffir Boy is an extraordinary memoir of life under apartheid is a triumph of the human spirit over hatred and unspeakable degradation. 
 
OR 
 
Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China by Jung Chang
Wild Swans is the story of three generations in twentieth-century China.  It is a record of Mao’s impact on China, an unusual window on the female experience in the modern world, and a tale of courage and love. Chang describes the lives and experiences of her family members: her grandmother, a warlord’s concubine; her mother’s struggles as a young idealistic Communist; and her parents’ experience as members of the Communist elite and Chang’s own experiences as a Red Guard,  a peasant, a “barefoot doctor,” a steelworker, and an electrician.

English 11 Independent Reading

Read Two:
 
Kaffir Boy by Mark Mathabane
Mark Mathabane was weaned on devastating poverty and schooled in the cruel streets of South Africa's most desperate ghetto, where bloody gang wars and midnight police raids were his rites of passage. Like every other child born in the hopelessness of apartheid, he learned to measure his life in days, not years.  Kaffir Boy is an extraordinary memoir of life under apartheid is a triumph of the human spirit over hatred and unspeakable degradation. 
 
Trash by Andy Mulligan
In an unnamed Third World country, in the not-so-distant future, three “dumpsite boys” make a living picking through the mountains of garbage on the outskirts of a large city.  Raphael is a dumpsite boy. He spends his days wading through mountains of steaming trash, sifting it, sorting it, breathing it, sleeping on it. Then one unlucky-lucky day, the world turns upside down. A small leather bag falls into his hands. It’s a bag of clues. It’s a bag of hope. It’s a bag that will change everything. Soon Raphael and his friends are running for their lives. 
 
The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
The White Tiger follows a darkly comic Bangalore driver through the poverty and corruption of modern India’s caste society.  The white tiger of this novel is Balram Halwai, a poor Indian villager whose great ambition leads him to the zenith of Indian business culture, the world of the Bangalore entrepreneur. On the occasion of the president of China’s impending trip to Bangalore, Balram writes a letter to him describing his transformation and his experience as driver and servant to a wealthy Indian family, which he thinks exemplifies the contradictions and complications of Indian society.
 
In the Time of Butterflies by Julia Alvarez
It is November 25, 1960, and three beautiful sisters have been found near their wrecked Jeep at the bottom of a 150-foot cliff on the north coast of the Dominican Republic. The official state newspaper reports their deaths as accidental. It does not mention that a fourth sister lives. Nor does it explain that the sisters were among the leading opponents of Gen. Rafael Leonidas Trujillo’s dictatorship. It doesn’t have to. Everybody knows of Las Mariposas―“The Butterflies.”
 
The Architect’s Apprentice by Elif Shafak
In 1540, twelve-year-old Jahan arrives in Istanbul. As an animal tamer in the sultan’s menagerie, he looks after the exceptionally smart elephant Chota and befriends (and falls for) the sultan’s beautiful daughter, Princess Mihrimah. A palace education leads Jahan to Mimar Sinan, the empire’s chief architect, who takes Jahan under his wing as they construct (with Chota’s help) some of the most magnificent buildings in history. Yet even as they build Sinan’s triumphant masterpieces—the incredible Suleymaniye and Selimiye mosques—dangerous undercurrents begin to emerge, with jealousy erupting among Sinan’s four apprentices.
 
Nectar in a Sieve by Kamala Markandaya
Married as a child bride to a tenant farmer she had never met, Rukmani works side by side in the field with her husband to wrest a living from a land ravaged by droughts, monsoons, and insects. With remarkable fortitude and courage, she meets changing times and fights poverty and disaster.  This story tells of a simple peasant woman in a primitive village in India whose whole life is a gallant and persistent battle to care for those she loves.
Independent Reading Seniors 2017-2018

Advanced Placement English Literature

Read four:

Brave New World (Aldous Huxley)
Brave New World is a searching vision of an unequal, technologically-advanced future where humans are genetically bred, socially indoctrinated, and pharmaceutically anesthetized to passively uphold an authoritarian ruling order--all at the cost of our freedom, full humanity, and perhaps also our souls.

1984 (George Orwell)
Winston Smith toes the Party line, rewriting history to satisfy the demands of the Ministry of Truth. With each lie he writes, Winston grows to hate the Party that seeks power for its own sake and persecutes those who dare to commit thoughtcrimes. But as he starts to think for himself, Winston can’t escape the fact that Big Brother is always watching...  A startling and haunting vision of the world, 1984 is so powerful that it is completely convincing from start to finish.

Any Dickens novel except The Christmas Carol